Andre Perry

Report offers ways to fix New York City’s segregated schools – Education Article

There’s an adage many researchers and policy wonks live by: What gets measured, gets done. The saying suggests that measuring something enhances your ability to achieve it — except, of course, when you’re talking about integrated schools. We’ve quantified, studied and assessed the importance of diversity in schools, but it’s something we haven’t come close to achieving. While housing segregation strongly influences the composition of the student body, even in diverse cities, low-income black and brown students are increasingly becoming…

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Denver teachers take to the picket line to protest inadequate pay – Education Article

Denver high school social studies teacher Nick Childers, right, chants as teachers picket outside South High School on February 11, 2019 in Denver, Colorado. Denver teachers are striking for the first time in 25 years after the school district and the union representing the educators failed to reach an agreement after 14 months of contract negations over teacher pay. Photo by Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images In an era of fractured politics, teachers of different ethnicities, with varying levels of seniority, in…

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When OK attire depends on your skin color – Education Article

Every day educators teach students the adage, “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” Many are familiar with the biblical verse, “Judge not, that ye be not judged.” Martin Luther King, Jr. dreamed that one day we’d live in a nation where children (and their parents) “will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.” All of these sayings are saying the same thing — yet what does it say about us…

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To un-muzzle upstart Negros, we need black-owned news media – Education Article

When I was a newly minted college professor in New Orleans in the winter of 2004, I began writing regular editorials for the Louisiana Weekly, a newspaper devoted to the city’s black community. Whereas the Times-Picayune society pages bore little resemblance to my adopted majority-black city, the writers and editors of the LA Weekly ensured the faces and voices of local heroes like the late activist Dyan French Cole, better known as Mama D, were well-represented. Whereas mainstream publications in…

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Students are supposed to read The Scarlet Letter, not wear it – Education Article

At the start of the 2018-19 school year, every student at Mingus Union High School in Cottonwood, Ariz. was issued a color-coded ID badge.* In the past, red badges denoted a student’s rank as an underclassman. Juniors and seniors wore gray badges. Beyond distinguishing between older and younger students, color coding provided a sense of progression, rank and seniority. However, last year the school decided to take a different direction in categorizing students. Mingus Union forced academically underperforming students to…

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Bold, progressive ideas, like quality Pre-K, aren’t unrealistic – Education Article

Universal pre-K, which was once considered a pipedream for liberal Democrats, is coming closer to reality — because predominantly white conservatives in the deep red state of Alabama have decided to dream along with liberals. After decades of lobbying by early childhood advocates, local businessmen agreed to fund individual programs and initiatives, and used their influence with the staunchly Republican legislature to increase state spending on pre-K in 2012 by $9 million, up 47 percent from the year before. In…

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