Children

I’ve always worked in nurseries. How do I get a ‘grown-up’ job? | Life and style

I qualified as a nursery nurse almost 10 years ago. I knew it was never going to make me rich, but I enjoyed it at the time. Now I’m almost 29 and I worry that I won’t ever be hired to do anything else. I have excellent transferrable skills (near-infinite patience, ability to multitask, keep written and electronic records, deal with people from all walks of life, calm under pressure, and more) but all my CV is about jobs in…

Read More

Take our Sats maths quiz to see if you’re smarter than an 11-year-old | Education

On Wednesday and Thursday year 6 children in England’s primary schools will take their Sats maths test. If you haven’t had children in the English education system for a while, or even at all, you might be curious about what 11-year-olds are expected to know about maths. So below is a sample of the types of questions they will face. Pupils will take 110 minutes of tests, divided into three papers over two days and containing a total of 83…

Read More

Secret Teacher: I hated teaching – until I realised my school was the problem | Teacher Network

Not so long ago, I was ready to quit teaching. Now, I’ve got my sights on leadership. The difference is my headteacher. Under my previous head, I got the point where I couldn’t go on. I was signed off work with anxiety and stress. At school, we’d been under intense pressure to get more children to expected levels to show the school was improving – and were always on edge thanks to drop-in observations. As a member of the school…

Read More

Mental health: the students who helped themselves when help was too slow coming | Education

Last year, Molly Robinson, 15, was struggling to cope with the symptoms caused by an undiagnosed health condition. The unexplained pain, plus the worry about what was wrong, caused her to feel increasingly anxious and distressed. She plucked up the courage to seek help. And what happened? “I was put on a waiting list.” Over the next three months things just got worse until she began to feel “completely overwhelmed”. “Everything snowballed,” says Molly. At crisis point, she couldn’t cope…

Read More

Sleep-deprived pupils need extra hour in bed, schools warned | Education

Sleep experts are warning of an epidemic of sleep deprivation among school-aged children, with some urging educational authorities to alter school hours to allow adolescents to stay in bed longer. Adequate sleep is the strongest factor in the wellbeing and mental health of teenagers, and a shortage is linked to poor educational results, anxiety and obesity, they say. The French education minister approved a proposal to push back by an hour the start of the school day to 9am for…

Read More

Pupils’ climate change strike threat poses dilemma for heads | Education

Headteachers across the country will this week be faced with a tricky dilemma: should they allow their pupils to go on strike? Thousands of schoolchildren are expected to absent themselves from school on Friday to take part in a series of coordinated protests drawing attention to climate change. At a time when politicians fret that young people are failing to engage with the political process, a headteacher’s decision to take a hard line against the strikers could be counter-productive. But…

Read More

The NHS 10-year plan doesn’t do enough for children | Al Aynsley-Green | Education

The government’s NHS 10-year plan, which launched last month, has been broadly praised by children’s organisations. The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, for one, celebrates that “it lays the foundations for an NHS with infants, children and young people at its core”. But does it? The plan, which aims to transform an overloaded health service, comes at an important time for children. The need is stark. We have some of the worst outcomes for children’s health, education, social…

Read More

Critics take aim at subsidies given to private schools | Education

It is hard to imagine a more exclusive chain of prep schools than the one that has been entrusted with the education of the third-in-line to the throne. That privilege has been bestowed on Thomas’s, a group of four London public-school feeders, where the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have chosen to send Prince George. With annual fees of about £18,000, Thomas’s, Battersea, is reassuringly expensive and boasts fittingly palatial facilities, including the Grade II-listed Great Hall Theatre, a gymnasium,…

Read More

Call for more regulation of home-schooled children in England | Education

The children’s commissioner for England is calling for greater supervision for children being home-educated after their numbers have doubled in the past five years, driven by pupils being “off-rolled” or informally excluded by schools. Anne Longfield wants the estimated 60,000 home-schooled children in England to be registered with local authorities as well as stronger measures to stop schools illegally pushing pupils off their books, often by persuading parents to home-school them. In a report to be published on Monday, Longfield…

Read More

Minister rejects call for blanket ban on mobile phones in schools | Education

The education secretary, Damian Hinds, has said the government should not introduce a ban on mobile phones in schools, saying the decision should be left to headteachers. Hinds’ remarks contrast with those of the schools minister, Nick Gibb, , who has told the BBC: “My own view is that schools should ban their pupils from bringing smartphones into school or the classroom.” But in a recent interview with the Guardian, Hinds said mobile phone use by pupils was a complex…

Read More

Legal action prompts academy to consider isolation unit criticisms | Education

An academy chain has pledged to look at criticism of its use of isolation units in a review of its behaviour policy, after a student mounted legal action against the trust. Proceedings were lodged in the high court in December against Outwood Grange Academies Trust’s use of “isolation booths”, spaces in “consequence rooms” in which children sit in silence for hours as punishment for breaking school rules. The trust runs 31 schools across Yorkshire, the Humber and the east Midlands.…

Read More

Star of the Week … do some primary school rewards do more harm than good? | Education

On a frosty winter’s morning in Oxford, pupils at St Aloysius’ Catholic primary school file into the hall for their end-of-week assembly. Today the headteacher will be handing out certificates to those who have displayed the school’s “virtues”. The head, Tom Walker, calls on one or two children from each class to receive awards highlighting how they have supported friends, or taken a risk, or perhaps played with a child who was on their own. Each announcement is followed by…

Read More

Secret Teacher: teaching children without play was soul-destroying | Teacher Network

One year, during Sats preparation, I watched as a number of my year 2 students cried because the paper was too difficult. I told them not to worry and to just try their best, but inside I felt dreadful. I knew that no matter how hard they cried, I would force them to continue. I’ve been a teacher for five years and I love working with children. But I’ve realised I don’t want to teach them any more. After spending…

Read More

Steiner schools aren’t cranky – we develop heart, head and soul | Letters | Education

Zoe Williams (These Steiner ‘failures’ are really a failure of the free school agenda, theguardian.com, 18 January) is wrong to imply that Steiner schools endorse the sometimes odious views of Rudolf Steiner. Steiner himself argued against this. This misconception is as ridiculous as saying that Britain’s most esteemed schools still promote the views of founders who may have traded slaves or opposed votes for women. Steiner schools attract a diverse group of parents who are highly committed to their children’s…

Read More

Drive aims to increase number of men in early years education in UK | Education – Education Article

A drive is under way to increase the number of men working with the youngest children in the education system, drawing on the success of Norway, which has the highest percentage of male early years professionals in the world. According to latest statistics, just 2% of the early years education (EYE) workforce in the UK is male, a figure that has remained static for decades despite previous targets and greater shared childcare between men and women in the home. Researchers…

Read More
About

We provide a omprehensive collection of education articles, blogs, videos and social media posts.