How grassroots efforts are trying to solve the teacher shortage crisis – Education Article

Prophet Giles III works through questions, similar to those seen on the math portion of the Praxis Core exam, during a RISE teacher certification cohort class at Coahoma Early College High School in Clarksdale, Mississippi in late January. Aallyah Wright for Mississippi Today CLARKSDALE, Miss. — Cleveland native Toni McWilliams didn’t feel like she was putting her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in business administration to good use working as an administrative secretary for a middle school in her hometown. The…

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New educational programs find ways to foster student resilience – Education Article

The Hechinger Report is collaborating with The New York Times to produce Bulletin Board, page 2 of the Times’s education supplement, Learning.   Megan Nickels, PedsAcademy founder, helps Ella Greene build a robotic version of her dog. PedsAcademy offers kids rare opportunities for engaging, high-tech learning while they’re at Nemours Children’s Hospital in Orlando. Eve Edelheit for The New York Times Learning through hospital stays Ella Greene never liked math. Then the 9-year-old got bone cancer and needed to stay…

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Rural schools have been minimally adequate for too long – Education Article

  I remember as a young reporter for The State newspaper in South Carolina’s capital, Columbia, driving with a colleague in 1999 to the old Bishopville High School in rural Lee County. The school was still in operation, despite having been condemned. (Its main lobby ceiling had collapsed in an incident that could have killed someone.) Some of the classroom windows were missing panes of glass, open to the wind. I returned to the car after the visit, profoundly startled…

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A South Carolina district looks at more data to identify struggling students – Education Article

Editor’s note: This story led off this week’s Future of Learning newsletter, which is delivered free to subscribers’ inboxes every Wednesday with trends and top stories about education innovation. Subscribe today! Adults in a school generally know the names of the most at-risk students. Those having the hardest time academically or emotionally stand out. In Richland School District 2 in suburban Columbia, South Carolina, Erin Armstrong says if students are ranked according to risk, the top 10 to 15 names…

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AVID is helping fast-diversifying suburban schools boost outcomes for all – Education Article

The view from the entrance of Ridgeview Charter Middle School in Sandy Springs, Georgia. Photo: Nick Chiles for The Hechinger Report SANDY SPRINGS, Ga. — Standing in front of Ridgeview Charter Middle School in this Atlanta suburb, you can’t help but notice the opulence of the homes that surround it. Soaring turrets. Columned entrances. Lush lawns. These are folks who clearly have bitten off a sizable chunk of the American dream. Inside the doors of the middle school, there’s a…

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How a federal free meal program affected school poverty stats – Education Article

Participation in the federal lunch program is used to track student poverty rates. Photo: Tovin Lapan In 2014, schools had a new way to give students free breakfast and lunch, paid for by Uncle Sam. Instead of asking low-income families to apply for the meals, a school district could opt to give everyone free food if at least 40 percent of the student population was already on other forms of public assistance or fell into a needy category, such as…

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Report offers ways to fix New York City’s segregated schools – Education Article

There’s an adage many researchers and policy wonks live by: What gets measured, gets done. The saying suggests that measuring something enhances your ability to achieve it — except, of course, when you’re talking about integrated schools. We’ve quantified, studied and assessed the importance of diversity in schools, but it’s something we haven’t come close to achieving. While housing segregation strongly influences the composition of the student body, even in diverse cities, low-income black and brown students are increasingly becoming…

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After years of inaction, Delta teacher shortage reaches ‘crisis’ levels – Education Article

Kaitlyn Barton writes down young patron’s orders while working her second job at Yazoo Pass in downtown Clarksdale last Halloween. Barton teaches English full-time at Clarksdale High School. Photo: Eric J Shelton for Mississippi Today MARKS, Miss. — Not long after Cortez Moss accepted the job as principal of Quitman County Middle School in 2016, he realized that his first months would be devoted nearly entirely to teacher recruitment. He was studying an Excel hiring tracker at home one March…

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A teacher comments on three classroom trends that are gaining ground – Education Article

  I have been teaching humanities to ninth-graders at Codman Academy Charter Public School in Boston for the last 12 years. It’s the middle of my first year back in the classroom after a year away as the 2017 National Teacher of the Year. While on my journey, I observed three patterns in particular that I’d like to share: Teacher leadership, social and emotional learning, and fellowship. Related: Switching sides in the teacher wars Not all teachers will have the chance…

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Students at tribal colleges and universities are slow to seek financial aid – Education Article

Editor’s note: This story led off this week’s Higher Education newsletter, which is delivered free to subscribers’ inboxes every Thursday with trends and top stories about higher education. Subscribe today! Hundreds of students at tribal colleges and universities who need financial aid are waiting until the last minute to ask for it, according to report released this week from the Center for Community College Student Engagement at the University of Texas at Austin. Among entering tribal college students surveyed in…

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Mississippi one of ten states leading in encouraging healthy schools – Education Article

Editor’s note: This story led off this week’s Mississippi Learning newsletter, which is delivered free to subscribers’ inboxes with trends and top stories about education in Mississippi. Subscribe today! Mississippi has been highlighted in a new report as one of ten states in the nation that has robust policies that encourage “healthy schools,” defined as those that fully support a student’s “academic, physical, emotional, and social well-being.” The report, released by several organizations including the nonprofit Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Child…

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Data analysis reveals what drives student success – Education Article

Editor’s note: This story led off this week’s Future of Learning newsletter, which is delivered free to subscribers’ inboxes every Wednesday with trends and top stories about education innovation. Subscribe today! Trilogy Education partners with universities around the world to offer fast-paced certificate programs in high-demand fields including web development and cybersecurity. Since 2015, more than 10,000 people, mostly working adults, have graduated from programs created by Trilogy and offered in partnership with universities such as Georgia Tech, Northwestern, Rutgers…

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A school comes together to help immigrants to learn – Education Article

  The Donald McKay School in East Boston, where I serve as principal, has always reflected our community not only in terms of population, but also in spirit and approach. For generations, immigrant strivers have called East Boston their Gateway to America. Today, East Boston is home to the highest percentage of foreign-born citizens in any Boston neighborhood. Here, we are the proud educators of the next generation of strivers in a school that is 89 percent Latino, the majority…

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Denver teachers take to the picket line to protest inadequate pay – Education Article

Denver high school social studies teacher Nick Childers, right, chants as teachers picket outside South High School on February 11, 2019 in Denver, Colorado. Denver teachers are striking for the first time in 25 years after the school district and the union representing the educators failed to reach an agreement after 14 months of contract negations over teacher pay. Photo by Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images In an era of fractured politics, teachers of different ethnicities, with varying levels of seniority, in…

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If girls are bad at math, should we blame their mothers? – Education Article

Girls in biased homes performed worse on math tests, study finds. Jackie Mader/The Hechinger Report There are loads of theories for why girls tend to do worse in math than boys, from differences in innate ability to discrimination by teachers. Many argue that our culture discourages girls from excelling at math. Now a team of economists has produced a study that calculates how a family’s attitudes about women can impede girls’ math achievement at school. Specifically, in the state of…

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A student who fled Katrina says there aren’t enough mentors in schools – Education Article

My life was turned upside down when Hurricane Katrina forced my family to leave New Orleans in 2005 and relocate to Texas and then Georgia.   I wasn’t thinking about the future. My family lost everything in the storm. And I always seemed to find some way to get myself in trouble. Then I found a caring adult in my school — Ms. Barnes, a Communities in Schools organizer. Ms. Barnes became my mentor. She was always there to help…

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17-year-old’s education startup to offer virtual sciences labs – Education Article

This screenshot from realism.io shows the chemistry Rocket Lab designed by Steven Wang and his co-founders. Screenshot by Jackie Mader/The Hechinger Report Editor’s note: This story led off this week’s Future of Learning newsletter, which is delivered free to subscribers’ inboxes every Wednesday with trends and top stories about education innovation. Subscribe today! Steven Wang got into the tech field about seven years ago – as a pre-adolescent. Now, at 17, he has a startup that is on the verge…

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How teachers are helping students affected by deportations – Education Article

While teaching in the bilingual program at Armijo Elementary School in Albuquerque several years ago, Juan Ortega provided support to one of his fourth graders whose father was deported. Ortega is a dual-language teacher at Coronado Elementary now, but hopes to return to Armijo as principal one day Courtesy of Juan Ortega SANTA FE, N.M. — Albuquerque teacher Juan Ortega saw a change in one of his fourth graders after the boy came home from school one day to find…

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The power of education data for Mississippi’s youngest learners – Education Article

More Mississippi students than ever before are gaining access to high-quality early learning this year thanks to increased funding for the state’s pre-K program. One big reason is the strong data on education outcomes that we have collected and shared in our state. Since we began our first state-funded pre-K program four years ago with $3 million, compelling data gathered on kindergarten readiness from our Early Learning Collaboratives has demonstrated the impact and importance of high-quality early childhood education for…

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When a college degree is no longer a ticket to middle class mobility – Education Article

The labor market value of a college degree has softened, stirring concern that a bachelor’s is no longer a gateway to the middle class. Photo: Kate Flock for The Hechinger Report This story is part of our Map to the Middle Class project, where we ask readers what they want us to investigate about educational pathways to economic stability. This question comes from Kieran Hanrahan. He asks: What are the projections for the size of the middle class assuming current…

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Is the cost of student teaching worth it? – Education Article

  I sat at my computer in the summer of 2013 pondering whether I’d be able to begin my student-teaching. I wondered whether spending four years learning to teach was worth the time and money, and whether my dreams of leading a classroom would ever come to pass. I wondered if I should wait to apply for a fast-track program after graduating, or if I should take a year off to work so I could save more money. Thousands of…

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When OK attire depends on your skin color – Education Article

Every day educators teach students the adage, “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” Many are familiar with the biblical verse, “Judge not, that ye be not judged.” Martin Luther King, Jr. dreamed that one day we’d live in a nation where children (and their parents) “will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.” All of these sayings are saying the same thing — yet what does it say about us…

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Deborah Gist, an education reform hero, switches sides in the teacher wars – Education Article

Tulsa Public Schools Superintendent Deborah Gist presents a Golden Apple Award to Dr. Abraham Kamara at Memorial Junior High School. Amadou Diallo for The Hechinger Report TULSA, Oklahoma — On a fall morning in 2018, veteran technology teacher Abraham Kamara was working with his robotics team at Memorial Junior High School when Tulsa school superintendent Deborah Gist entered the classroom with a TV news crew. Gist was there to surprise Kamara with the school year’s first Golden Apple Award, recognizing…

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After a hate crime, a town welcomes immigrant students into its schools – Education Article

Dalimar Rastello, director of Patchogue-Medford school district’s language programs, checks in on an immigrant student at the high school. Sarah Garland/The Hechinger Report This story is part of a series about how schools, teachers and students are coping with the immigration crisis. PATCHOGUE, N.Y. — Wilda Rosario’s support groups for immigrant students at Patchogue-Medford High School usually start out with lots of laughter. That’s just how teenagers are, she says. But it doesn’t take too long for conversations to turn…

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Among preschoolers, bullies who get bullied are at high risk for depression – Education Article

It turns out the old saying about sticks and stones breaking bones but words never hurting is bunk. According to research newly published in the peer-reviewed Early Childhood Research Quarterly, emotional bullying in the preschool years hurts quite a lot. When a child both bullies and gets bullied, the findings are especially clear: Depression symptoms begin to appear as early as age 3. Depression in early childhood increases the risk of depression in later childhood, which predicts depression in adolescence.…

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Varied results for blended learning and personalized methods of teaching – Education Article

In recent years, the state of Rhode Island has engaged in many innovative learning projects. This past semester I had the opportunity to observe two elementary classrooms using technology in new and exciting ways. One was a fifth-grade class at Whelan Elementary School in North Providence, Rhode Island, that had just agreed to begin a commercial personalized learning program. The other was a third-grade blended-learning classroom at Lincoln Central Elementary School, in Lincoln, Rhode Island. The fifth grades at Whelan…

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How do schools train for a workplace that doesn’t exist yet? – Education Article

Jobs in information technology are growing quickly and employers are trying to find ways to get kids excited about careers in the field. Sarah Gonser for The Hechinger Report This story is part of our Map to the Middle Class project, where we ask readers what they want us to investigate about educational pathways to financial stability. This question comes from Chris Burns in Ohio. He asks: Not knowing what tasks will be automated or what future jobs will look…

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New early-college high school pairs students with research scientists – Education Article

Editor’s note: This story led off this week’s Future of Learning newsletter, which is delivered free to subscribers’ inboxes every Wednesday with trends and top stories about education innovation. Subscribe today! Six Florida high school students are spending this year at the prestigious Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience, learning data science techniques and how to use them to analyze images of the brain. The students are in a pilot class of what will become the Max Planck Academy, set…

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A school superintendent helps students and their families after an ICE raid – Education Article

Hermenegildo Rubio stands with his children (from left) Abby, 16, Adam, 10, Danny, 20, and Noemi, 13, in the living room of his Honey Grove home. Photo: Kate Kilpatrick for The Hechinger Report This story is part of a series about how schools, teachers and students are coping with the immigration crisis. HONEY GROVE, Texas — Abigail Rubio, 16, was eating lunch in the cafeteria of Honey Grove High School when she found out ICE was raiding the trailer factory…

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Online prekindergarten access and funds for school counselors among bills proposed in Mississippi this year – Education Article

Editor’s note: This story led off this week’s Mississippi Learning newsletter, which is delivered free to subscribers’ inboxes with trends and top stories about education in Mississippi. Subscribe today! In the few weeks Mississippi’s legislature has been in session, legislators have proposed dozens of education bills addressing everything from the school calendar, to assistant teachers to prekindergarten. While a teacher pay raise and limits on student testing are anticipated to be major topics this year, lawmakers are hoping that proposals on…

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