11 Things We Learned This Week – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

This week, we learned … … there really is a black panther in Africa. This melanistic leopard—a black panther—prowls the Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo, not Africa.Photograph by Joel Sartore, National Geographic What are black panthers? Who are Black Panthers? Who is Black Panther?   … three tests the Green New Deal must pass in order to work. This building in Greensburg, Kansas, uses wind turbines, solar panels, and geothermal heat pumps—all renewable energy technologies.Photograph by Lauren Ayres, My Shot How…

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Using Immersive Stimuli to Drive Student Inquiry – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

The following post was written by 2017 Grosvenor Teacher Fellow Sarah Harris, a K-12 social studies curriculum specialist and middle school teacher, after her expedition to Antarctica. The Grosvenor Teacher Fellow Program is a professional development opportunity for pre-K–12 educators made possible by a partnership between Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic Education. Sarah observes a gentoo penguin colony on Barrientos Island. Photo by Peg Keiner As student inquiry becomes a primary focus of social studies and science instruction, educators across the nation are designing…

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11 Things We Learned This Week – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

This week, we learned … … the last five years were the hottest ever recorded. This classic Nat Geo map depicts climate change since 1960.Map by National Geographic Enroll in our free online course to learn how to communicate stories like this to your students.     … what’s happening with the four 2014 finalists for National Teacher of the Year. These are just a few of our favorite teachers attending our 2018 Grosvenor Teacher Fellow conference.Photograph by Rebecca Hale,…

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U.S. Botanic Garden Helps Teachers Build Green Communities – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

This post was written by educator Michael Cruse. Sometimes, evening professional development is a hard sell after a day of teaching, especially on a night with single-digit temperatures here in Washington, D.C. The lure of the humid tropics and desert Southwest were enough to convince me, though. Photograph by Mike Cruse I wasn’t bound for parts south of the polar vortex, but instead to D.C. Teachers Night at the U.S. Botanic Garden. Sitting at the base of Capitol Hill, the Botanic…

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Examining Local Flora – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

Camile Clarke led her high school students on a study of how human activities affect forest biomes in the Caribbean. Students conducted a field experience around their school in central Jamaica to observe characteristics of the local soil and vegetation as well as map the human impact on the natural landscape. Camile Clarke is a geography and social studies teacher at Mile Gully High School in Manchester, Jamaica. Photo by Aaliyah Williams As you explained in your National Geographic Educator Certification…

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11 Things We Learned This Week – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

This week, we learned … … school districts have gotten creative in announcing snow days. Find five fun ways to warm up on snow days!   … some good news! Central Mexico reported its first sighting of a black bear in more than 100 years! American black bears (like this one in California) are not endangered.Photograph by Michael Nichols, National Geographic What is the species range of the black bear?   … how a music teacher’s project is sending students…

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11 Things We Learned This Week – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

This week, we learned … … good grades and a great work ethic only get you so far. Read of the week! About 40% of Boston’s valedictorians make less than $50,000 a year.Photograph by Otis Imboden, National Geographic How does our learning framework support lifelong learning?   … how self-compassion, not self-esteem, supports academic motivation. “Self-compassion leads to learning goals instead of performance goals — such as trying again after messing up. It’s a better academic motivator than self-criticism. It’s…

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Slow Down, Connect, and Flip Your Perspective – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

The following post was written by 2017 Grosvenor Teacher Fellow Wendi Pillars, a high school teacher, after her expedition to the Arctic. Wendi is also the author of Visual Note-Taking for Educators: A Teacher’s Guide to Student Creativity. The Grosvenor Teacher Fellow Program is a professional development opportunity for pre-K–12 educators made possible by a partnership between Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic Education. Wendi takes in natural splendor from a Zodiac. Photo courtesy Wendi Pillars Imagine seeing a blue whale for the first time,…

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Growing a 28-Day Garden – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

Mike Johnston grew a classroom garden with his middle school science students as part of a study on food stewardship. Students deepened their knowledge of the impact of food consumption through a video call with a National Geographic Explorer. What is a 28-day garden? Often gardening is viewed as something that is arduous and time consuming. Planting a 28-day garden is a challenge to grow food from seed to consumption in 28 days. For our 28-day garden we spent the…

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Free Quality Education to One Million Children – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

This post was written by Koen Timmers. Learn more about Koen and his work here. Technology and innovation in our schools come with benefits and drawbacks. Augmented reality, 3D printers, blockchain, virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and a plethora of other unforeseen technological advances will be everyday realities in our students’ lives as they enter the workforce. New jobs will require skills like complex problem solving, creativity, empathy, and collaboration. Innovation Lab Schools Jane Goodall, world-renowned primatologist and anthropologist, founded the…

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11 Things We Learned This Week – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

This week, we learned … … “The science says to us that, in fact, the way the brain functions and grows, it needs safety, it needs warmth, it actually even needs hugs. We actually learn in a state of positive emotion much more effectively than we can learn in a state of negative emotion. That has huge implications for what we do in schools.” Learn more about the science of learning by enrolling in one of our free online courses!…

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2018 GeoBee Champ Celebrates Big Win in the Galápagos – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

The 2018 National Geographic GeoBee Champion, Venkat Ranjan (a.k.a. Venky), recently experienced a “life-changing” week aboard the National Geographic Endeavour II in the Galápagos Islands.   In addition to a college scholarship and a lifetime membership in the National Geographic Society, Ranjan won an all-expenses-paid expedition when he took top honors at the 30th annual National Geographic GeoBee last May. The trip was provided by Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic. “This trip can change your perspective on a lot of…

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Cultivating a Sense of Wonder with Early Elementary Students – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

The following post was written by 2017 Grosvenor Teacher Fellow Breigh Rhodes, a STEM specialist and elementary school teacher, after her expedition to Antarctica. The Grosvenor Teacher Fellow Program is a professional development opportunity for pre-K–12 educators made possible by a partnership between Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic Education. Breigh responds to students’ questions about Antarctica. Photo by Tammy Wood Scientist and author Rachel Carson wrote in The Sense of Wonder, “If a child is to keep alive his inborn sense of wonder, he…

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Meet the 2019 National Geographic Education Fellows! – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

Each year, the National Geographic Society selects outstanding educators to serve as Education Fellows. It is with pride, admiration, and enthusiasm that we announce our 2019 class. The goal of the National Geographic Fellows program is to empower and elevate individuals from a wide range of backgrounds and experiences who have demonstrated leadership and excellence, and provide them an opportunity to develop and/or lead an impact-driven project that is strategically aligned with Society priorities. The program also offers an important…

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What’s Your New Year’s Resolution? We Have Five Ways to Help You Keep It! – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

Did you know that the United States government has a resource to help you achieve some of the most common resolutions? (Yes, the PDF is still available during the shutdown.) I’ll bet most people can guess the resolutions that made the list: losing weight, managing stress, saving money and getting a better education, among others. Did your resolution focus on education? If so, congrats! You’re already making moves toward success by reading our blog. Here are some other fun ways to…

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Are your students ready for the GeoBee? Let’s help them prepare! – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

Good geographers combine information from different sources to arrive at logical conclusions. Through participating in the National Geographic GeoBee, your students will use the knowledge they have of the basic patterns of climate, geology, vegetation, landforms, human settlement, history, migration, and commerce—combined with their knowledge of regions and place-names—to answer questions. GeoBee questions are designed to teach students about these topics in varied ways, and the competition is designed to promote many different types of learning. Familiarize your students with…

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11 Things We Learned This Week – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

This week, we learned … … what it would sound like if people talked to other professionals the way they talk to teachers. Read of the week! Photograph of Grosvenor Teacher Fellows by Rebecca Hale We talk to teachers like the professionals they are—read up with our Educator Spotlight series.   … photosynthesis goes ping. Underwater, that process of converting sunlight and carbon dioxide into energy and oxygen sends tiny bubbles spiraling toward the surface. And according to new research,…

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11 Things We Learned This Week – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

This week, we learned … … where the U.S. government shutdown is having the biggest impact. Resource of the week! Have your students map where the shutdown is impacting your state with our MapMaker Kits.   … all the animals that went extinct in 2018, and which are on the brink in 2019. The last wild sighting of Hawaii’s po’ouli was in 2004, and a 2018 study recommended declaring the species extinct.Photograph courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Where are…

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Curating Digital Museums Makes Geography Personal – National Geographic Education Blog – Education Article

Our Educator Spotlight series features inspiring activities and lessons that educators are implementing with their students that connect them to the world in bold and exciting ways. Educators often use these projects to complete their National Geographic Educator Certification.   Laura Krenicki‘s sixth-grade class examined the paths of people and objects from a geographic perspective. The class read an Explorer magazine article by Paul Salopek, a National Geographic Explorer, and participated in a live video event with him. Then, students…

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