Mental Health

Universities and the NHS must join forces to improve student mental health | Gianmarco Raddi | Education

In universities, mental health problems such as depression and anxiety afflict one in four students, while student suicides have reached a record level in recent years and dropouts have trebled. The burden of mental health illnesses is only likely to increase as stigma recedes and more people come forward with their sufferings. According to the Institute for Public Policy Research, five times as many students as 10 years ago have disclosed a mental health issue to their university. It’s well…

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Secret Teacher: I hated teaching – until I realised my school was the problem | Teacher Network

Not so long ago, I was ready to quit teaching. Now, I’ve got my sights on leadership. The difference is my headteacher. Under my previous head, I got the point where I couldn’t go on. I was signed off work with anxiety and stress. At school, we’d been under intense pressure to get more children to expected levels to show the school was improving – and were always on edge thanks to drop-in observations. As a member of the school…

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Self-Care Is Priority One for This Teacher – Education Article

January is finally over. I swear this month had 974 days in it. After returning from Winter Break I felt as if I just could not keep up with myself. There is always so much to do and so very few hours in the day to balance everything. Normally this is when my really bad habits form, like skipping meals, drinking too much soda and eating too much junk food, foregoing date night with my significant other and sleeping in…

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Preparing Students For Teacher Absences – Education Article

I was gone two days this week because my fiancé had back surgery. Two. Whole. Days. This may not seem like much to most, but I teach special education with some very routine-oriented students and this was a huge whammy in their little lives. I know we want our classrooms to become autonomous and for kids to be flexible when life happens to their teachers, but sometimes I think we forget about how important we are in their little lives.…

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Mental health: the students who helped themselves when help was too slow coming | Education

Last year, Molly Robinson, 15, was struggling to cope with the symptoms caused by an undiagnosed health condition. The unexplained pain, plus the worry about what was wrong, caused her to feel increasingly anxious and distressed. She plucked up the courage to seek help. And what happened? “I was put on a waiting list.” Over the next three months things just got worse until she began to feel “completely overwhelmed”. “Everything snowballed,” says Molly. At crisis point, she couldn’t cope…

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A 4.30am start and three-minute toilet breaks: are you ready for microscheduling? | Life and style

Work is one of the biggest sources of stress in our lives, second only to health problems, according to a survey for the Mental Health Foundation last year. What work and productivity coaches call “overwhelm” is widespread, as notifications, conversations, distractions and interruptions all get in the way of actually getting stuff done. And not getting stuff done because you are overwhelmed is sure only to make matters worse. One response favoured by productivity gurus is microscheduling – creating a…

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Sleep-deprived pupils need extra hour in bed, schools warned | Education

Sleep experts are warning of an epidemic of sleep deprivation among school-aged children, with some urging educational authorities to alter school hours to allow adolescents to stay in bed longer. Adequate sleep is the strongest factor in the wellbeing and mental health of teenagers, and a shortage is linked to poor educational results, anxiety and obesity, they say. The French education minister approved a proposal to push back by an hour the start of the school day to 9am for…

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Time To Talk With Natasha Devon – Education Article

Reading Time: 3 minutes Do you speak up about mental health? February 7th is Time to Talk Day, an annual event spearheaded by magnificent stigma-squashing charity Time to Change. It’s a day to speak our minds and talk about mental health related issues, writes Natasha Devon, campaigner and writer. In the education world we are way ahead of the curve when it comes to thinking progressively and compassionately about mental health. Indeed, as someone who has one foot in education…

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We need to talk about…Education | Membership

Guardian supporters share their questions and experiences with a panel of journalists and industry experts. This episode focuses on education and what education systems around the world can learn from each other? How can we take the politics out of our education systems? What is the future for assessment and curriculum? How can we grow and retain our teachers, giving them greater ownership of their profession? And with the sidelining of creative arts in the curriculum, how we can better…

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The NHS 10-year plan doesn’t do enough for children | Al Aynsley-Green | Education

The government’s NHS 10-year plan, which launched last month, has been broadly praised by children’s organisations. The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, for one, celebrates that “it lays the foundations for an NHS with infants, children and young people at its core”. But does it? The plan, which aims to transform an overloaded health service, comes at an important time for children. The need is stark. We have some of the worst outcomes for children’s health, education, social…

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A student’s death: did her university do enough to help Natasha Abrahart? | Education

It began with a knock on the door. A police officer, sombre faced, saying she had tried earlier but the bell seemed to be out of order. Natasha Abrahart, 20, daughter, sister, granddaughter, niece and friend, talented Bristol University second-year physics student, a keen musician who enjoyed indoor climbing and baking cakes, was dead. Worse – if it can be worse – she appeared to have taken her life, alone in her student room. That was eight months ago. Since…

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Leading Others Without Being An Asshole – Education Article

Reading Time: 2 minutes How do you interact with other people you work with? I’ve been reading quite a number of books on business and leadership over the past 18 months: Two books I am currently reading include The Asshole Survival Guide by Robert I. Sutton and To Sell Is Human by Daniel H. Pink which I have already written about and have demonstrated how I do this. Something to think about … “Before you diagnose yourself with depression or low self-esteem,…

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5 Things I Learned From Quitting Teaching – Education Article

Reading Time: 3 minutes What did I learn from quitting my teaching job? There’s a great sense of pride among those who teach, particularly those that have just a few years under their belt. They’ve made the bold move to become a teacher, perhaps having to justify their decision to friends and family, and that’s why it can be gut-wrenching to admit to yourself that you are considering quitting teaching. I know this because I did just that. Two schools…

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the narrative of the martyr teacher has to come to an end. – The Girl On The Piccadilly Line – Education Article

A friend and ex. colleague of mine recently asked me for some advice. She is currently working as an Assistant Head in a particularly challenging school: high levels of deprivation, tough behaviour and the sort of data that has you living in fear of “the call.”  She is a fantastic teacher: skilled, hardworking and completely committed to her work. “I know I’m making a difference where it really matters.” She said, “I can see the impact of my work which is…

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