Labour would end free market in higher education, says Rayner | Education

A Labour government would end the “failed free-market experiment in higher education”, taking a tougher line on vice-chancellors’ pay and improving academic diversity, the shadow education secretary is set to announce. Angela Rayner will outline a series of major policy steps that would allow regulators to intervene in how universities in England are run, including how they recruit and reward staff. Speaking to the University and College Union (UCU) conference on Saturday, Rayner will say: “The Tories’ obsession with free-market…

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What Will It Take to Get Equitable School Funding in Pennsylvania – a Statewide Teachers Strike!? – Education Article

What if every public school teacher in Pennsylvania refused to come to work on Monday? What if instead they took to the streets with signs and placards, bullhorns and chanted slogans. Maybe: “Hey! HEY! Ho! HO! This Unfair Funding Has to Go!”Or: “What do we want!? FAIR FUNDING! When do we want it? YESTERDAY!” The problem is that from Pittsburgh to Philadelphia and all places in between, the Keystone state has the most unequal school funding system in the country.…

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Colin Barker obituary | Education

In 1965 a labour sociologist arrived in Manchester, fresh from Oxford University, to conduct an ethnography of the lives of the mainly female workers in an engineering factory. Convivial and unpretentious, and an accomplished cook too, Colin Barker was “adopted” by the women amid huge amusement. When he left, one of them wrote him a letter saying they “missed him and his little dumplings”. He kept it pinned on his wall for years. My friend Colin, who has died aged…

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What is the point of higher education if it doesn’t make people happy? | Jonathan Wolff | Education

In The Methods of Ethics, a book read only by philosophers with an overdeveloped sense of duty, the late Victorian utilitarian moralist Henry Sidgwick argued that other philosophers of his day were wrong to believe that human beings act only for the sake of their own happiness or pleasure. There is a second spring of human action, he argues: the pursuit of excellence. A poet, a philosopher, or a sportsperson working obsessively may hope to be happy, but, more likely,…

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‘It’s not about my school’: teacher’s TV drama depicts stress in class | Education

“ONOMATO PO E.I.A. BOOM!, ONOMATO PO E.I.A. BOOM!” bellows a teacher to a classroom of unimpressed teenagers. His enthusiasm for the written word is struggling to get much buy-in from the disengaged mass in front of him. This is the story of Shaun, a downtrodden English teacher who is eventually beaten by the system, as depicted in the TV drama Beaten, shown last week on BBC One (and now screening on BBC iPlayer) as part of a series compiled by…

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How Do Ofsted Select A School For Inspection? – Education Article

Reading Time: 3 minutes What metrics are used to determine which school Ofsted will visit next? On 22nd January 2019, I made a Freedom of Information request to Ofsted. I wanted to know what sources of data Ofsted uses to calculate/predict which schools to inspect next?”. Freedom of Information “Dear Ofsted, For a number of years, Ofsted has used statistical models to ensure proportionate inspection. Your new methodology has not changed and you believe will improve your capacity to identify…

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Cambridge doesn’t need a £100m gift but other universities do | Letters | Education

In choosing to contrast Birkbeck with the University of Cambridge, Marthe de Ferrer hits a nail squarely on the head (If you’ve got £100m to spare, don’t give it to Cambridge, 7 February). The decade I spent teaching at Birkbeck taught me more about the spirit and purpose of education than three spent in more conventional universities. Lacking almost all the perquisites now seemingly essential to attract full-timers, without exception Birkbeck’s mature part-timers made up for what they might have…

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Replace GCSEs with baccalaureate, says Conservative MP | Education

GCSE exams in England should be scrapped and replaced with a baccalaureate for school leavers that includes vocational skills and personal development, as part of a radical overhaul proposed by an influential Conservative MP. Robert Halfon, the MP for Harlow who chairs the House of Commons education select committee, is the first Conservative policymaker to break ranks over the future of GCSE exams, after the government’s efforts to improve their status by making them more difficult. Halfon, who has campaigned…

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Rahm Emanuel’s Non-Apology Apology for Being a School Privatization Cheerleader – Education Article

    Rahm Emanuel’s recent op-ed in The Atlantic may be one of the dumbest things I have ever read.   The title “I Used to Preach the Gospel of Education Reform. Then I Became the Mayor” seems to imply Emanuel has finally seen the light.   The outgoing Chicago Mayor USED TO subscribe to the radical right view that public schools should be privatized, student success should be defined almost entirely by standardized testing, teachers should be stripped of…

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Low-cost, no-frills Durham private school attacked by teachers | Education

A new private school offering a no-frills education for just £52 a week will open its doors to pupils in Durham this week, despite vociferous opposition from teaching unions, which say it is impossible to provide a quality education on such a low budget. The launch of the Independent Grammar School: Durham has been greeted with scepticism by many in the sector who accuse the school’s founders of using children as guinea pigs in an educational experiment and trading on…

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Schools staff crisis looms as austerity hits teachers’ pay | Education

Ministers have conceded that teachers’ pay has fallen by thousands of pounds a year since the public spending austerity drive began, amid warnings of a “looming crisis” in attracting and retaining new staff. Classroom pay has fallen by more than £4,000 a year since 2010 in real terms, according to a government assessment. Damian Hinds, the education secretary, warned that only a 2% increase can be expected for the next academic year. The admission comes in the Department for Education’s…

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The Trouble with Test-Obsessed Principals – Education Article

    When I was a child, I couldn’t spell the word “principal.”   I kept getting confused with its homonym “principle.”   I remember Mr. Vay, the friendly head of our middle school, set me straight. He said, “You want to end the word with P-A-L because I’m not just your principal, I’m your pal!”   And somehow that corny little mnemonic device did the trick.   Today’s principals have come a long way since Mr. Vay.   Many…

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Private schooling at the public’s expense | Letters | Education

Robert Halfon, chairman of the House of Commons education select committee, is right to defend the principle of “continuity of education” for government staff serving overseas (which applies to the MoD, FCO, DfID and families from other departments). However, he is wrong to say that use of exclusive, eye-wateringly expensive “public” schools by government staff at taxpayers’ expense is due to the lack of availability of state boarding schools (Charitable status? Critics take aim at subsidies given to private schools,…

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Talk about Marxist historian under fire for breaching workers’ rights boycott | Education

Leading academics have been accused of undermining a protest about workers’ rights in London in order to give a talk about a historian famous for his support of workers’ rights. Sir Richard Evans was due to discuss his book on Marxist historian Eric Hobsbawm at the University of London on Thursday evening, breaking a boycott supported by hundreds advocating better employment conditions for cleaners and other outsourced staff at the university. Martin Jacques, the former editor of Marxism Today, and…

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Teaching all pupils to act more like Etonians won’t help solve inequality | Suzanne Moore | Opinion

It really does take a special kind of inattention to observe public life today and conclude that what we need is more public school swagger. Our politics is currently dominated by men who are so convinced of their own swag it’s dangerous. We know where politics as a debating society with no real-world consequences leads: Jacob Rees-Mogg and Boris Johnson are exemplary only in their callous recklessness. Still, here we have the education secretary, Damian Hinds (I know no one…

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We need to talk about…Education | Membership

Guardian supporters share their questions and experiences with a panel of journalists and industry experts. This episode focuses on education and what education systems around the world can learn from each other? How can we take the politics out of our education systems? What is the future for assessment and curriculum? How can we grow and retain our teachers, giving them greater ownership of their profession? And with the sidelining of creative arts in the curriculum, how we can better…

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The NHS 10-year plan doesn’t do enough for children | Al Aynsley-Green | Education

The government’s NHS 10-year plan, which launched last month, has been broadly praised by children’s organisations. The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, for one, celebrates that “it lays the foundations for an NHS with infants, children and young people at its core”. But does it? The plan, which aims to transform an overloaded health service, comes at an important time for children. The need is stark. We have some of the worst outcomes for children’s health, education, social…

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Denying loans to students with weaker A-levels will ‘penalise poor families’ | Education

Plans to deny student loans to those with lower A-level grades would hit poor families in regions where social mobility is already stalling, data obtained by Education Guardian shows. In the north-east a third of students who would be denied a university education come from the most disadvantaged backgrounds. Four months ago, the education secretary, Damian Hinds, launched Opportunity North East, a £24m campaign to raise aspirations and stop children in the region feeling they’ve been “left behind”. But the…

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2nd Amendment, Slavery & Creating Critical Readers & Thinkers – Urban Education Mixtape – Education Article

One of the most important jobs that a history teacher has is threefold: learn the truth, know the truth and teach the truth. When teaching children of color, understand that traditionally, the “canon” has withheld the whole truth of American history. Whether Black or White, if you’re a history teacher, it is your obligation to unearth the withheld truths – for students of all backgrounds. Knowledge absent of truth is not power; it is to be inhibited. In light of…

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Critics take aim at subsidies given to private schools | Education

It is hard to imagine a more exclusive chain of prep schools than the one that has been entrusted with the education of the third-in-line to the throne. That privilege has been bestowed on Thomas’s, a group of four London public-school feeders, where the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have chosen to send Prince George. With annual fees of about £18,000, Thomas’s, Battersea, is reassuringly expensive and boasts fittingly palatial facilities, including the Grade II-listed Great Hall Theatre, a gymnasium,…

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Pittsburgh Christian Academy Tries to Become a Charter School to Cash in on Taxpayer Funding – Education Article

    The line between public and private school is getting awfully thin in Pittsburgh.   City public school directors received a request from Imani Christian Academy, a religious school in the East Hills, to be allowed to transform into Imani Academy Charter School for the Fall term of 2019.   Though parochial schools have metamorphosed into charter schools in Florida, Tennessee and Washington, D.C., this would be the first such transformation in Pennsylvania, according to Ana Meyers, executive director of…

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Universities raise alarm over no-deal Brexit and EU student enrolment | Education

University leaders have said that a no-deal Brexit would constitute “one of the biggest threats” ever faced by the sector, as figures revealed a further decline in EU student enrolment, particularly in postgraduate research. According to the Russell Group of universities, there was a 9% decrease in the number of EU postgraduate research students enrolling at its institutions this academic year. The fall follows a 9% decline the previous year, and has potential consequences for Britain’s research capacity. Dr Hollie…

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No other European country tests children at 16: let’s scrap pointless GCSEs | Sandra Leaton Gray | Education

We all could and should be having a relaxed summer but instead, 16-year-olds are grimly anticipating their GCSE results this Thursday. It doesn’t have to be this way. The UK is the only European country to have high-stakes testing at 16, with others adopting a more enlightened approach. This I discovered while leading a research project in 2016 that involved watching polyglot pupils in the European schools mill around their airy buildings in jeans and T-shirts. The European schools are…

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Deborah Gist, an education reform hero, switches sides in the teacher wars – Education Article

Tulsa Public Schools Superintendent Deborah Gist presents a Golden Apple Award to Dr. Abraham Kamara at Memorial Junior High School. Amadou Diallo for The Hechinger Report TULSA, Oklahoma — On a fall morning in 2018, veteran technology teacher Abraham Kamara was working with his robotics team at Memorial Junior High School when Tulsa school superintendent Deborah Gist entered the classroom with a TV news crew. Gist was there to surprise Kamara with the school year’s first Golden Apple Award, recognizing…

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After a hate crime, a town welcomes immigrant students into its schools – Education Article

Dalimar Rastello, director of Patchogue-Medford school district’s language programs, checks in on an immigrant student at the high school. Sarah Garland/The Hechinger Report This story is part of a series about how schools, teachers and students are coping with the immigration crisis. PATCHOGUE, N.Y. — Wilda Rosario’s support groups for immigrant students at Patchogue-Medford High School usually start out with lots of laughter. That’s just how teenagers are, she says. But it doesn’t take too long for conversations to turn…

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Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

Next week many public school teachers in Oklahoma are staging a walkout to gather in Oklahoma City at our capitol. There are multiple goals for different teachers and educator groups for the walkout, and securing a pay raise from the state (which has not happened in 10 years, not even a cost of living increase) is one of them. The walkout is not just about teacher salaries, however. The Oklahoma teacher walkout is also about repeated cuts to other state…

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Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

This week in Oklahoma has felt a little like Arab Spring in the midwest of the USA. I traveled to Egypt in November 2017 to speak at an educational conference, and the conversations I had with a family friend during that visit about the populist uprising in Tahrir Square which led to the mixed results of the 2011 Egyptian Revolution have been on my mind frequently ever since. Last week in Oklahoma City, thousands of public school teachers from around our…

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Universities could lose league table positions for diversity failures | Education

Universities’ prized league table positions may be under threat if they fail to tackle ethnic disparities among students, and in staff recruitment and research, as part of an initiative announced by the government. The effort to “explain or change” ethnic disparities is the latest official attempt to help underrepresented groups enter and succeed in higher education in England, backed by the Cabinet Office and the Department for Education. The announcement by David Lidington, the Cabinet Office minister, calls for league…

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Work isn’t working – but a four-day week would help fix it | Will Stronge | Opinion

Our current political moment is defined by a state of paralysis. By refusing to face the reality of a broken economic model, reactionary forces are driving us towards a future based on exclusion, continued deregulation and the scrapping of workers’ rights. Instead of conceding to this “inevitable” race to the bottom, progressive forces of all kinds need to meet the crises of the 21st century head-on by putting forward proposals that tangibly improve people’s lives. As Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has demonstrated…

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Moving at the Speed of Creativity – Education Article

Moving at the Speed of Creativity | Understanding the Puerto Rican Blackout: Bank Regulation, Bureaucratic Inefficiency and Leadership Meta Tags and Inline Scripts — .nav-collapse.collapse { height: auto; overflow: visible; } HTML Body — This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Made with Love in Oklahoma City (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js =… This is only a…

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